0:00

´╗┐TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, my name is Trudi-Ann Lawrence, today is September fourth [2013], and I am at Keansburg Amusement Park. Can you state your name?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: William Gelhouse.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And your age, if you don't mind sharing?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Sixty.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And for the record, can you state your race or ethnicity?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: My what?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Your race or ethnicity?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Caucasian, I guess.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How long have owned the amusement park?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Since 1995.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Can you tell me about how you started the amusement park?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, I didn't start it, and my brother and I own it together. His name is Henry. And my grandfather started it, and then my father operated it, among other things, and he sold it in 1973. And then my brother and I bought it back--back in the family--in 1995. And then in 1996, we built the water park, 1:00which is where we are right now.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: So we have both operations.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Is there any reason why you decided to keep the business running?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: When you say running, do you mean in 1995, or do you mean 2012?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: 1995, when you bought it back.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: We bought it back--my brother was here as a tenant. He operated the kiddie rides and a couple stands. So the owners wanted to get out, they came to him and wanted to know if he'd be interested in buying them out, and he contacted me, so we decided to go in it together.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Is there anything else you like about the area, any specific--

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well this is a family place, and it was a family-run park. Everybody still thought we owned it. And I guess it's our heritage. So we decided to go back into it, and change it around the way we thought best for the future.

2:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. All right, so can you tell me about when you first heard the storm was coming, the preparations that you made?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, we had tried to batten down the hatches as best we could and take apart as many rides as we could. We were hopeful that the berm and dune system would protect us as it has in the past. So with the one-week notice that we had, we tried to secure as much as we could, take apart as many rides as we could, all the cars and that type of thing, but we weren't really prepared for the fact that the berm failed, and actually the dune failed. The state had not properly maintained it after the last storm, which was Hurricane Irene, and so all of a sudden they come in and start to dump sand where it had weakened, but 3:00in order for a dune to be successful, it has to compact and age, and it didn't have a chance to do that. So when this storm came, it failed where it was the weakest, and had the state done what they should have done after Hurricane Irene, we wouldn't even be having this discussion--

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: --because it would not have failed, we would not have gotten inundated with sand and water.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Are you from the area?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Yes.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So did you evacuate, yourself?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: No, where I live it is high enough that it wasn't going to be an issue. The issue obviously is always electric, which we lost for a week. But my brother lives near the Shrewsbury River and the water came right up to his house. So it flooded his crawl space, but it didn't really damage the house in 4:00any fashion. I was high enough that it wasn't a problem. My daughter, on the other hand, had seven feet of water in her house.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: She lives in the area?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: She lives in the area. She lives next to the Leonardo Marina.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Okay, so during the storm, the first day of the storm, can you recall what the weather conditions were like?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Stormy. (laughs) So it was just bad weather, and the problem was that the way the winds were blowing was pushing the tides inland, and that was really the big thing, just the track of the storm and the direction of the wind caused much higher than normal water, and you know, it was just luck of the draw. Had the storm been off by a hundred miles one way or the other, we 5:00probably would have escaped the devastation that we actually received.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So the next day, when everything, the storm had passed, what did you do?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, the storm hit on a Monday, so--Sunday, Monday. Tuesday, I think I came down, but everything was flooded here. You couldn't really get in too much, so I wasn't here very long. Wednesday we came back to take a look, we could actually get in and walk around, and then we got a game plan together and on Thursday (phone rings) we started to work in earnest, started the cleanup procedure.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So can you describe what you saw when you came down here?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Devastation. We were lucky in one sense, we had only lost one 6:00building. But the dune failed--the berm failed, I should say--so all of the sand from the berm washed into our facility. All of our rides were now covered with either sand or grass, debris from the water. And it was just an absolute nightmare. So, we really just picked a spot and said, All right, let's start here and work our way. We started at one end and worked our way towards the other end, over the last two months.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Also my next question, how long did it take you?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, it took forev--it took all winter, really, and it was seven days a week. There was no days off. We were fortunate in that we had a contractor on site before the storm, who was ready to put in two new slides that 7:00we had ordered. So, he had started the demolition of the old slides and was digging up to prepare for the new foundations for the new slides. So he is a pretty talented guy, but so he just changed gears and he jumped over to the amusement park, and we used his equipment, and we had equipment that we got from other sources, and it was just digging it out, and cleaning it out, getting rid of all the debris and sand and the things that washed in that shouldn't have been in here. So but that was a good, at least two months, and we had to secure the property because all our fences were destroyed, many of our garage doors to 8:00the buildings were destroyed. The one happy thing was, the way the buildings were built, the structural walls was parallel to the flow of water. So structurally we came through okay, but cosmetically it was a mess and of course all the garage doors acted as floodgates, and they were pushed in on the boardwalk side, water came into the buildings, pushed out the garage doors on the other side, on the street side, and then the water just flowed through. So if there was one bright spot, that was the bright spot, because most of the retaining walls were still intact, so we didn't lose any of the buildings. It was mostly cosmetic, and it gave us a chance to shore up buildings that needed shoring up--facades. So, we had an engineer here weekly, and directing us, giving us plans on, This is what you gotta do to make it, to put Humpty Dumpty 9:00back together again. So that's what we did, and then we had a team of carpenters that worked with the other contractor, plus we had our electrical contractor, because all of the wiring, all of the motors, a lot of control units for the rides, they were damaged, if not destroyed, and that was his job to get the wiring back in place. So he was here for, really, right through July Fourth, getting it back together again. All of our contractors were here through July Fourth and maybe even a week or two after that. It's just been constant struggle. But now we're at the point where everything is pretty much back to the way it should be, and we took the opportunity to improve the place. So we have 10:00re-themed it, we have put in landscaping, we've put in concrete that's been carved to look like stones, we've put in decking that was much more sturdy than what we had, and every place that we have touched, we had made significantly better than it was before the storm. So we've tried to make lemonade out of lemons.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Did you have any assistance from FEMA or any insurance companies?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Basically, very little. FEMA is--because we're a business they have different rules. They're not giving out money, they want to give you a loan. But the loan is at a very high interest rate. So FEMA is really, for us, useless. Insurance companies, we've gotten some money on our claim, but if we 11:00had to rely on insurance companies to rebuild, we'd be nowheres. So we had to use our own pockets.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you think that the media had accurate coverage or was moreso sensationalized?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, I work seven days a week. Watching TV and reading the papers was not high on the agenda. So I don't really know exactly how they portrayed it. I know the articles that had to do with us were accurate. So whether the other articles were, I don't know. But we had a lot of people here and they, I think, different media outlets, and they portrayed us, I think accurately.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Did you ever run into a problem or ever have to worry about crime with the area being open as it was, or is it--

12:00

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, one of the first things we did is we got a temporary fence in, and we were able to ring the property with the temporary fencing. The problem that we had was that we had, in preparation for the storm, taken a lot of our vehicles and cars off the rides and put them in the carousel, which we thought would be safe. Turned out, it was not, so things floated away. And so the first day back, in addition to starting cleanup, was also a rescue mission, to go out as much as half a mile away to reclaim all of the pieces that had floated away. So when the dust settled, we lost one vehicle, still haven't found it. It's in somebody's garage. But of all the many, many parts that we had, that 13:00was a pretty good track record. (coughs)

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Did you receive help cleaning up from outsiders, maybe volunteers?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Yes, we did. When the storm first hit, when we were surveying the damage, we thought we could rehab our roller coaster. Roller coaster was pretty much ground zero where the dune failed, so we had four feet of sand in the coaster, and that's kind of, obviously an open steel structure. But you couldn't use equipment to get into the structure, because of all the supporting beams that are along the ground. So we had volunteers from Jersey Cares, American Coaster Enthusiasts, volunteer groups that would gather people from 14:00various businesses, and so they came in and we had to dig out that four feet of sand from the coaster by hand. Now, it turned out, when we had dug it out and took a look at it, the amount of work--because there was some twisting and bending of the structure--the amount of work to put it back to right just made it economically unfeasible, so we ultimately sold the coaster.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Which coaster was this?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: That was called The Wildcat, and that was in such condition that we had to sell it to an outfit that was going to run it but had the wherewithal to do the structural repairs, because a lot of the steel pieces were thirty, forty feet long. It was beyond our capability. So we wound up buying a 15:00new coaster, which we're in the process of checking it over, and we're going to put it up in the fall.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How do you feel about the president and the governor making their appearance in the area?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, I think it was a rah-rah team. It was, I think, more for morale than anything. It really didn't help us in doing what we had to do. The government really had no meaningful role in it. We got more help from the local government, which allowed us--the municipality--which we took an absolute mountain of trash, and they were able to dispose of that mountain of trash that we had, and they got that money to dispose of it through FEMA. So indirectly we benefited from that, no question about that. So and town was very good to us. 16:00They wanted us to rebuild, so they made it as easy as realistically possible, with the bureaucracy, which you have to deal with to rebuild and reopen.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And do you think this storm has changed your views in any way, like environmentally?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, you never know what Mother Nature has in store. But one of the things that kept me going and my brother going was that there had been storms here in the past, and storms--pictures that we have, the storm of '44, Hurricane Donna in the late fifties, early sixties--they did more damage. So my feeling was, if my grandfather and father could do it, we could do it. And that's what we did.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So I know you said for the most part, things have 17:00returned to normal. Are there any changes that you're facing?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well it's been kind of a tough slog, because the state ride inspectors and the entire department put us under a microscope, because of all the damage. So we got no free passes. We had to really make it better than it was. I mean, when the dust settled, our rides were like they came out of the factory. So much was replaced on them, and rehabbed, that they were in as good a shape as they'd ever been. And we did a lot of cosmetic work to them, and so all 18:00of our rides look like they came out of the factory, and performed like they came out of the factory.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Same with our buildings. The buildings were obviously in three to four feet of water, so the insides of the buildings have been gutted, new electrical system through it, so it's like it's brand new.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. All right. Do you think the storm somehow had an impact on the presidential election, given the fact that a lot of people had to relocate to vote or anything like that?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: It may have. I think a lot of local towns were hurt way beyond the level of destruction we had. Whether they voted or not, that's another question. Obviously, when your house has been destroyed, you have different priorities, and voting may be down the list, so I can't say that it helped or 19:00hurt. I don't know. History will have to judge that, not me.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Are you still making any repairs now?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Oh yes. We had to pick and choose our battles, so there are about three buildings that we haven't looked at too carefully, or done any serious work. They were boarded up. One arcade, one ride--a spookhouse ride--and one restaurant, the Heidelberg. So and one stand that we're going to turn into a french fry stand. The french fry stand that was here last year was with the pizza stand and a fresh fruit stand. There were three joints, four joints in that building, and that building was destroyed. We came back, the only thing 20:00left was the roof, sitting on the ground, twenty feet away. So the pizza stand reopened. We put it in another location. But the french fry stand, we have a location for it, but we just never really got to it. We're lucky we got to the 90 percent level or 95 percent level. So this winter, we're going to try to turn our attention to the things that we just didn't have the time to do.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Did you have to make any increasing payments towards insurance since the storm?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: No. We've changed our insurance policies to upgrade them a bit. And the rates actually went down, but because we increased the coverage, the total premium actually went up.

21:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you think the storm will have an impact in the governor election that's coming up?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, I think in the sense that Christie's been all over and he's gotten a tremendous amount of media coverage, I think that can only help him. The challenger [Barbara Buono] doesn't have access to that kind of coverage, so to the extent that people know who he is and have the impression that he is doing his best to get things back to normal, it'll help him.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. If you can give one word of advice, from one business owner to another, in Moore, Oklahoma, who's suffered a devastation like you have, what would that word of advice be?

22:00

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, one word, I can't think of one word.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, a phrase.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: It's, Get to it and stick to it. Get yourself a plan and carry it out. We're not Einsteins, and the nature of our business is such that when there's a problem--you have problems all the time--that you face the problem and you correct the problem immediately. This is not a committee decision where you have to have meeting after meeting. I mean, when we have to make a decision, the decision is made within minutes or hours, not within weeks. So, time is not on your side, and every minute you waste thinking is a minute less for things to be done, and when you have to speed things up to get it done, the costs go way up. 23:00So, you need to--as I said, we were very lucky. In Seaside, they couldn't get into their premises for three or four months. In three or four months, we were cleaned up and we were knee-deep in rebuilding, by the time they just even got in there to survey the situation. So we got a lot of lucky breaks. I mean, obviously, I wish we didn't get the break of the dune failing, but recovery-wise we did it pretty good. When we built the water park in the winter of '95 and the spring of '96, from the idea to do the water park, with no financing, no approvals, no engineer, no architect, no slides, no nothing, just sitting here, saying, Okay, let's go and do it, it was from what you see now, which is twenty 24:00or so slides, the lazy river and spas, the whole bit. From the time that we started to go forth to the time that we had opened and had paying customers, was nine months and one week. In New Jersey, that's unheard of. It takes you longer to build an addition to your garage than to build an entire water park. So we know how to get things done, and we used that same ability to put Humpty Dumpty back together again across the street.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What would you say was your motivation or your strength to just get out there and just continue and clean up and just go with the drive and the passion that you had?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, both my brother and I are operators. We don't sit behind 25:00a desk. Today is September fourth. I was in my office yesterday, and I looked at--I have a daily pull-off calendar, it says July fifteenth. So I haven't been up at my desk to actually do things other than not emergency, but absolutely necessary paperwork in almost three months. So we operate. We are here, we do the jobs that need to be done. We don't just point a finger and say, Go do it. We pitch in and do it. So everybody sees that, and I think that's a good management technique for anyone, that you lead by example. So, they see me pick up the garbage, and I tell them, "You're not better than I am, I'm no better than you are. I can do it, you can do it." So everyone gets the message that 26:00they're here to do a job and they'd better do that job, and whether it's fun or distasteful, tough. The job has to get done. And at the end of the day, we're judged on results. And our results this year have been pretty spectacular, not to pat myself on the back. But the fact that we are open and we're open as fully as we are is not due to someone coming in and waving a magic wand. There was obviously some luck involved, but it was primarily hard work. So I suppose, if I had to sum it up, it wouldn't be a one-word sum-up. It would be two words: hard work.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you intend on passing on the business, to your 27:00future generations?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Well, that would be nice. Whether that happens or not, we have fourth generation. Here, this is third generation. Not many businesses can say they're in third generation. But time will tell.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: We're still young enough that we've got some time before we have to make that decision. Hopefully, that would be the best thing for it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. If you can say the legacy of the storm, or the central message, what would it be?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: It forced us to take our ten-year plan and condense it into nine months. The legacy is that we have come back better. I hate to sound like a slogan, but that's really what it is. We're bigger than we were. We have more rides. We're better than we were. It's much prettier and much more up to date. 28:00This amusement park is from 1905, so what's that, 108 years that there's been an amusement facility here. And we've updated it to bring it up to the 2010 and beyond, 2010s, 2020s, and beyond. We've positioned ourselves for the future. So that's the other tangential benefit of the storm, that it forced us to update and improve. Things that, you know, when you see it everyday, sometimes you just take it for granted that it looks good and it's as good as it needs to be. But this forced us to take a hard look and decide, no, we can be better.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Have you noticed an increase in business, like more people coming out, or it's--

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: That's hard to say. For the year, we are not up, that is for 29:00sure. But on nice days, we are up. So this year, because of the weather, we've had a lot of rainouts--way more than normal rainouts. We've had a lot of cloudy, windy, cool days, things that are not conducive to business for basically 20 percent of our time. And you can't really overcome that. So but on the nice days when the sun is shining and it's warm, we're doing well.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Is there anything else that I missed that you possibly would like to share?

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: No. Thank you for taking the time to interview me, and I hope this works out so somebody learns something.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Thank you.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: That's really one of the things that I like is that in this industry, people are willing to share their knowledge and their work. We've had 30:00to have volunteers--not volunteers, but workers from Morey's [Pier] came here and pulled out our motors for us and send them out to get them fixed. We had Scott Simpson from Ocean City, had a spare compressor and a forty-thousand-dollar compressor--we used his spare, he just gave it to us. We run one of our million dollar rides with that compressor. So there's been some generosity from people in the industry to help us out and, you know, there but for the grace of God goes I, kind of thinking, I suppose, that they weren't really hurt, or were hurt very minimally, and we got really devastated. So I guess it's good to have friends, and in this industry, I've learned a lot from 31:00others who are very good about sharing knowledge. Technically, they're our competitor, but not really, because of the way things were spaced out. But the industry has been very supportive for us, and it's made up of really nice and generous people.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. All right, thank you.

WILLIAM GELHOUSE: Okay.

end of interview

0:00 - Introduction of Gelhouse

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Partial Transcript:Okay, my name is Trudi-Ann Lawrence, today is September fourth [2013], and I am at Keansburg Amusement Park. Can you state your name?

Segment Synopsis: Sixty year old Gelhouse has owned Keansburg Amusement Park with his brother since 1995. The park has been in their family for generations.

Keywords: Brother; Business; Contact; Ethnicity; Family; Keansburg Amusement Park; Waterpark

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

2:04 - Gelhouse / his brother preparing for the storm

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Partial Transcript:Okay. All right, so can you tell me about when you first heard the storm was coming, the preparations that you made?

Segment Synopsis: Gelhouse and his brother to prepare for the storm by taking apart some amusement rides. They were relying on the berm and dune system to keep the water and sand from coming into the amusement park,but the system failed.

Keywords: brother; Daughter; Devastation; Direction; Dunes; Electricity; Evacuate; Flooding; Hurricane Irene; Prepared; Shrewsbury River; State; Storm; Tides; Water; weather; Winds

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

4:22 - During the storm

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Partial Transcript:Okay. Okay, so during the storm, the first day of the storm, can you recall what the weather conditions were like?

Segment Synopsis: Gelhouse says the way the winds were blowing during the storm, was pushing the tides inland.That was the worst part of the storm because the berm would not be able to hold.

Keywords: Cleanup; Debris; Devastation; Direction; Flood; Procedures; sand; storm; stormy; Tides; Water; Weather; Winds

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

6:44 - The process of putting the Keansburg Amusement Park back together

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Partial Transcript: Okay. Also my next question, how long did it take you?

Segment Synopsis: It took a lot of work and time to repair the damage from Sandy. Gelhouse believes that the changes have made the amusement and water park significantly better.

Keywords: Amusement parks; Boardwalks; Clean; Contractors; Damage; Debris; Destroyed; Equipment; Fortunate; Mess; Significance; storm; Street; Water

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

10:35 - Assistance from insurance companies / the impact of media

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Partial Transcript:Okay. Did you have any assistance from FEMA or any insurance companies?

Segment Synopsis: Gelhouse did not receive money from FEMA or insurance companies. Most of the money for repairs came from his own pocket. Gelhouse did not pay much attention to the media because he was very busy cleaning up the amusement park. However, he recalls that everything he had read in the newspaper about his park was accurate.

Keywords: Crime; FEMA; Insurance; Media; Money; Preparation; Safe

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

13:09 - Volunteers helping out with the Amusement Park

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Partial Transcript:Did you receive help cleaning up from outsiders, maybe volunteers?

Segment Synopsis: Gelhouse and his brother had volunteers from Jersey Cares, American Coaster Enthusiasts. Gatherd people from local businesses to help clean up the park.

Keywords: Businesses; Conditions; Help; Structure; Volunteers

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

15:15 - Local government, Municipality, / the people of Keansburg helping with the clean up process

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Partial Transcript:Okay. How do you feel about the president and the governor making their appearance in the area?

Segment Synopsis: The governor did not play a big role in helping in the clean up process at the park. The local government and the people of Keansburg really help significantly. The Municipality removed trash from the park, that helped also with the cleanup process. Gelhouse says that there has been storms that have been much worse. If his grandfather and father were able to rebuild and keep the park then, there is know reason why Gelhouse and his brother can't rebuild.

Keywords: Damage; FEMA; Governor; Local government; Money; Municipality; Normal; Rebuild; State; storms; Town; Trash

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

18:28 - Impact on the presidential election

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Partial Transcript:Okay. All right. Do you think the storm somehow had an impact on the presidential election, given the fact that a lot of people had to relocate to vote or anything like that?

Segment Synopsis: Gelhouse states that he thinks that a lot of towns were too devastated by the storm to worry about voting and history can only tell if it affected the presidential election.

Keywords: Building; Destroy; Election; House; Roof; Vote

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

19:10 - Making repairs / the governor's election

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Partial Transcript:Okay. Are you still making any repairs now?

Segment Synopsis: According to Gelhouse there are still repairs that need to be completed such as one of the building in the park. He has also updated his insurance policies. Gelhouse states that the govern election was effected by Sandy, since Christie received a lot of media attention, and not many people knew about Barbara Buono.

Keywords: Buildings; Christie; Coverage; Election; Governor; Insurance; Media; Normal; Repairs; Roof; Sandy

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

21:48 - Advice for other business owners

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Partial Transcript:Okay. If you can give one word of advice, from one business owner to another, in Moore, Oklahoma, who's suffered a devastation like you have, what would that word of advice be?

Segment Synopsis: Having a plan and sticking to the plan is a very important factor in trying to rebuild a business according to William.

Keywords: Business owner; Cost; decision; Dunes; Oklahoma; problem; Recovery; Seaside; Waterpark

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

24:45 - Management technique

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Partial Transcript:What would you say was your motivation or your strength to just get out there and just continue and clean up and just go with the drive and the passion that you had?

Segment Synopsis: Gelhouse motivation was to come back bigger than ever and according to him he has received that goal. Gelhouse and his brother are both operators so they do not just sit behind desks all day. Their Management technique consisted of everyone doing the same thing such as, picking up garbage. Everyone had worked as team to cleanup and worked very hard each day.

Keywords: Business; Garbage; Generations; Job; Manage; operators

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.

27:26 - Legacy of the storm

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Partial Transcript:Okay. If you can say the legacy of the storm, or the central message, what would it be?

Segment Synopsis: Other park owners have been very supportive of Gelhouse and his brother, and many generous people helped out. The amusement park is now updated.

Keywords: Amusement parks; Business; Legacy; Message; Ocean City; Rain; storm; Updates

Subjects:


GPS: Keansburg Amusement Park (Keansburg, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.455407, -74.137103.
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