0:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: My name is Trudi-Ann Lawrence and today is December 12. Can you state your name?

NELSON RIVERA: My name is Nelson Rivera.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And if you don't mind sharing your age?

NELSON RIVERA: My age is 48.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, and for the record, can you state your ethnicity?

NELSON RIVERA: Excuse me?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Ethnicity.

NELSON RIVERA: Oh, I'm Puerto Rican. Hispanic.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Oh, okay. So how long have you lived here?

NELSON RIVERA: I've lived here for thirteen years.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And if you don't mind sharing, originally how much was the cost of your home?

NELSON RIVERA: We paid $130,000. Or that's how much we owe, I think, still. $130,000.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so how many rooms is there?

NELSON RIVERA: Three bedrooms and a kitchen, living room, and bathroom.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Is there a specific reason why you chose this house out of all the houses here?

NELSON RIVERA: My wife liked the house. She grew up in Union Beach. And she fell in love with the house when we looked at it.

1:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Are you originally from Union Beach?

NELSON RIVERA: No, I'm from Red Bank, and my wife is from- originally from Union Beach.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so what made you navigate-

NELSON RIVERA: To Union Beach?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yeah.

NELSON RIVERA: We met in high school in freshman year and she went for a [unclear] Union Beach out of high school.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. All right. Okay, so tell me about your family, who makes up your family, who lives in the house?

NELSON RIVERA: My family would be wife, two sons, and my daughter.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so what's your current occupation?

NELSON RIVERA: I'm a fuel service technician.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And how long have you been doing it?

NELSON RIVERA: About fifteen years.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so what do you like about living in New Jersey?

NELSON RIVERA: It's got the schools. The town that we live in is small. It's a nice community and, um, it's- I grew up in New Jersey, so I think that it's a good state.

2:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Where do you usually spend your leisure time, here in the community?

NELSON RIVERA: We spend it pretty much here in Union Beach, and we travel to the Jersey shore in the summer, on vacation, and basically that's pretty much it. We're pretty local.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so can you describe the neighborhood a little bit more to me, about, like if you're involved or anything, or the reputation of the community?

NELSON RIVERA: Union Beach is a very small town. We don't even have a downtown, we don't have a high school. It's a shore town close to the beach here, and it's a nice community. Everybody kind of knows each other and we're all a pretty close community, so-

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so now we're going to talk about the storm. When was the first- when did you first hear the storm was coming?

NELSON RIVERA: We were hearing it all week before the storm, which was October 3:0029, and that's when we were supposed to mandatory evacuation, and we decided to stay and ride it out.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

NELSON RIVERA: On the 29th. And that's when [pause] we almost thought that [laughs] it was just pretty bad.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right. So what did you expect? Did you expect the storm to be anything of its caliber or not?

NELSON RIVERA: We knew it was a bad storm. We thought it would be maybe a lot of flooding, but we never thought it would reach, like, the house, because we never had water in the house since we been here. And, either- in fact, in '93? A big Noreaster in '93 and the water was all over here but it never reached the front steps.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, all right, so did you make any preparations?

NELSON RIVERA: I kept my Suburban in the driveway, thinking we could get out, 4:00and we had water and flashlights and stuff like that. But we ended up bailing out upstairs in our bedroom.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Were there long waits in lines--

NELSON RIVERA: Oooh.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: -when you wanted to get stuff, for preparation?

NELSON RIVERA: Well, there were long- yeah, there was, everybody was buying, of course. Water and flashlights and pretty much filling up the gas tanks. That's as far as preparation we did. I mean, um, we anticipated losing power for a couple weeks or maybe a week, but it was longer than that.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, did you make any preparations for your dog?

NELSON RIVERA: My dog? No, we didn't think- we didn't think we were going to get flooded in the house, so we really didn't prepare for a major flood.

5:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

NELSON RIVERA: So it was- it was [pause] lack of preparation, maybe, lack of- thinking that it was going to be just maybe three feet of water or it would never reach the house, but-

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right. Do you think you had adequate warning for the storm?

NELSON RIVERA: Oh yeah, there was plenty of warning. We were supposed to leave -- mandatory -- and we thought we could ride it out. There was plenty of warning, we could- even the governor was telling you to leave if you lived by the water. Like I said, a lot of us stayed in my neighborhood. My neighbor across the street, and- a few of us stayed. We've been here for a long time, we thought, hey, we'll get a little bit of water, maybe two feet, three feet, and we'll be all right.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So take me through the first day of the storm, like where were you, what were the first signs of the storm?

NELSON RIVERA: Uh, October 29, we were here, we were just waiting to see if it 6:00was going to get as bad as they think- you know, they said it was going to be, and about 6:30, I was outside with the camera just kind of walked to the beach to see how bad it was, and it was getting really rough. A little bit after that, the water started coming down the street, down the sidewalk really fast. And I was telling my wife, wow, this is getting bad, we should leave. By 7, there was maybe already a foot and a half in the front of the house and there was so much debris on the street, I couldn't even pull my car out, so we just decided to stay, to stay and see what happens. And I think about 8:30 water started coming in through the front door, and that's when we took our dog upstairs, we took 7:00whatever we could and tried to put it up, you know, off, like the couches, and stack them up on top of each other, whatever paperwork we thought was important, we ran upstairs with it. And by, I think 8:30, our power line had already ripped off the house and water was in the house already, about a foot and a half of water was already in the house, and the wind was blowing pretty rough. We were upstairs, so 1:30 in the morning, when the water receded, and we ended up making a run out of here, thinking things were going to get worse. And it took us about an hour to get out of this little town because there was so much debris already, in the street, power lines and--and that's when we realized that it was worse than I ever thought.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Where did you go?

NELSON RIVERA: We went to my brother-in-law's a town over, in Keyport, and we 8:00stayed there until the next morning when I left with my brother-in-law because he lived in Union Beach, in Brooke Avenue, and he wanted to see if his house was still there, and we came back at 6:30 in the morning, the whole Brooke Avenue was disappeared. There was not one house standing. Everything on his street was gone. There was not even a sign of a shingle or a roof, just front steps if they were made out of concrete. But the whole street was gone, and there was a house in the middle of the street. And it was just- I was saying, most of the houses were ripped off the foundation. So it was, it was pretty bad. Worse than I ever seen or thought I would.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right.

NELSON RIVERA: It was bad.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Did you get to sleep when you ever made it to-

NELSON RIVERA: No, we didn't sleep. I was soaking wet from trying to get out of 9:00the house, and we just laid there and waited til morning, to come back in town and see what was the damage. So, we really didn't- I didn't sleep at all.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So, did you have anyone that you needed to contact?

NELSON RIVERA: I just contacted my family that I knew, just to tell them that I was okay and that we, we made it. Besides that, we really didn't call any insurance or anything at that time. We were just- we were trying to assess the damage, the house full of mud, you know. Everything was- everything was wet. So we, just, were planning on how to settle- we had the upstairs os we were trying to settle and see what we were going to do.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so tell me about the damages that you suffered. Was it the entire first floor?

10:00

NELSON RIVERA: The entire first floor. I, um, my wife's car was completely flooded, past the windows. The whole backyard, the sheds, the tools, all the furniture, all the appliances. Everything in this whole downstairs and are of the outside, the deck and all that, was gone. So, there was a lot of damage.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So the next day, once you got back, when you settled in upstairs, what did you do then, next?

NELSON RIVERA: We were trying to scramble to get our, some generators, because we had no power, and the gas station, the lines were- I waited five hours for a gallon of gas, and everything was just, like, like a warzone, kinda. So we 11:00stayed and we kinda washed the house with bleach and tried to get all the mud out. And thought that it would have been good enough, but then the mold set in a week later, and we all got sick. And we had to leave- well, my wife did. I stayed upstairs to rebuild. And yeah, that's how we managed to get back in within the year. There's still a lot of people are still out.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So you stayed even though you were sick?

NELSON RIVERA: Mmhmm. I stayed with an electric heater and a little refrigerator upstairs. And we had a lot of volunteers- I mean, more than I ever thought, from all over the country.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You had to rip everything-

NELSON RIVERA: We had to rip, and, yeah, we had people from Calgary Chapel Church, there was Rain Foundation, there was Gateway Church, there was a lady up 12:00north from a collection agency, Elizabeth Hill, who put collections together, help, and that's how we ended up getting a lot of this done. Insurance was never- always a nightmare, and so our insurance really didn't give us a lot.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: When did you- did you contact them or FEMA?

NELSON RIVERA: We contacted FEMA and we were denied because we had flood insurance. So we ended up going to our insurance and then that took forever, and I think somewhere in January, FEMA gave us an apartment in Port Monmouth that, um, we were able to stay there and keep rebuilding-

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Wow, congratulations.

NELSON RIVERA: And we just came back on the 29th, which was the year anniversary, to move back in, and that was the help from FEMA for getting us a place.

13:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so how did you cope with everything that was going on around you?

NELSON RIVERA: I do my best. I just kept going at it and just not thinking about how bad it was.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yeah.

NELSON RIVERA: Just keep doing it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You're pretty strong staying, being sick and everything. So how did you notice how your community started coping with everything that was going on around them?

NELSON RIVERA: We kind of got all together. We talked to neighbors. We had neighbors that we just say hi once in awhile, you never really know them until this happened, and then we all became close, and we all shared information, where to go to get help, and we all kind of like stuck together and said, "well, you know, if you need anything." You know, a lot of the- where our police station is became more like a place where all the information was given out, 14:00food was given out, there was donations coming in from all over the place. So, it was kind of like Marshall law here for a couple months. There was no- it was all controlled by the army and the state, and we were pretty much locked in this area, from- because of the amount of damage.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So, did you feel safe with anything, like did you have to worry about looting?

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah, well, I was staying here and I had somebody try to break into the house at nighttime but my dog started barking, and that's when I realized somebody was trying to come in through the backdoor we used to have over there. And I seen the door opening, and someone was trying to loot or break in. Because a whole lot of the residents around here, you know they left while they were rebuilding. But it was late at night, around 11:00, and I was worried 15:00about looting. Like I said, somebody did try to break in in the middle of the night.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: But did you feel safe regardless, though?

NELSON RIVERA: Uh, I didn't really feel safe, but I- [pause] I slept with a baseball bat.

[Both laugh]

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You did what you had to do.

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so-

NELSON RIVERA: And it was me and my brother-in-law, because he lost his house. So me and him stayed here for most of the worst part of it, to try to rebuild.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right. So, what was the interaction with your emergency personnel like?

NELSON RIVERA: Like I said, the volunteers, the local firemen, everybody was great in helping out. Everybody came together and we really, we never had a problem with, you know, getting help. So it was always, um [unclear -- talking 16:00to son] So, yeah, we had a lot of, a lot of, a lot of help and stuff, so it's -- everybody became pretty much together at that point.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So, was there any other aid that you received, or did you contribute in any way?

NELSON RIVERA: I helped out a little bit at the police station, unloading and loading trucks, volunteering. There was aid that was part of, like I said, a lot of churches and stuff were helping out, volunteers, and demolishing stuff. The work was done, because they brought volunteers from different states and [unclear -- interruption]

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So, um, did you lose anything that's irreplaceable?

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah, we lost a lot of stuff. We didn't lose as much as other 17:00people that lost pictures and the whole house, but we lost, you know, still stuff that was down here, a couple mementos…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: All right. So how did you feel about the response that you got from, um, your insurance companies, the government?

NELSON RIVERA: Um, the government pretty did a good job in trying to respond and help. The insurance company, they were pretty much terrible. They told us that we lost everything in the basement and we don't have the- it's not a basement, it's the first floor. And they pretty much only gave us what we lost, which is another battle, but we're in the house now and we just have to elevate, we have to go up about six feet.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

18:00

NELSON RIVERA: So, but in the meantime, we're here, and we'll probably have to move out again for another ninety days.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: For the elevation?

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So, how are you doing it, are they going to jack the house up, or are they-

NELSON RIVERA: They're going to jack it on those hydraulics. I'm not sure how they do it, but there's -- this is all being done through the New Jersey Strong that Christie put together.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, the--

NELSON RIVERA: To help people, the grant. And that's how it's being done.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So can you tell me more about the Jersey Strong, because this is the first time I've heard you reference it- anyone reference it as being a type of aid?

NELSON RIVERA: Well, it's an- when Obama put money out for the Sandy recovery he thought that he'd give so many millions to New Jersey, and Christie put together it, called New Jersey Stronger.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right.

NELSON RIVERA: And it's run by the state and they're the ones that you can apply for $150,000 to rebuild -- up to that much, but everything that you receive from 19:00the insurance agency counts.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

NELSON RIVERA: So whatever's not done, they- if you qualify, they'll give you a grant for the rest of it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

NELSON RIVERA: So that's how we get the Jersey Strong grant, and that's going to help us with the lifting.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, very good.

NELSON RIVERA: Because it's not the furniture and it goes up to, like, they say maybe up to $10,000 a year, if you don't elevate.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right.

NELSON RIVERA: So that's where we're at right now.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you think New Jersey prepared adequately? Like they had enough dunes?

NELSON RIVERA: Uh, Jersey shore was never prepared for any kind of storm like this. I think we built so fast and everybody's been building for years and years along the shore, and nobody ever prepares for a storm of this magnitude.

20:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right.

NELSON RIVERA: And now everybody's rebuilding for future storms [unclear]. That's why now we all have to elevate.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So, what do you think the state could have done differently?

NELSON RIVERA: Um, I don't think that they- they probably would have had prepared years ago for something like this, but I don't think they ever expected New Jersey to get hit by this kind of storm. [unclear] Hundred year storm.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right.

NELSON RIVERA: So, we never thought it would be the perfect storm.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Um, do you think anyone is to blame for it, or it's just nature taking its course?

NELSON RIVERA: It's just nature taking a course. I don't think there was nobody to blame.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right.

NELSON RIVERA: It's happening all over. And there's storms in the Philippines, and there's storms in other parts of the world getting bigger, stronger, so it 21:00could be global warming, who knows?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, how do you feel about the media coverage? Do you think it was accurate or it was sensationalized?

NELSON RIVERA: Um, it was, it was accurate. I don't think it was [pause] you know, overdone, or-

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, how do you feel about Obama and Christie making their appearance in the area?

NELSON RIVERA: Well, I think it was good that they showed that they were here to help, being they're both from different parts, so they kind of like stuck together and did what they had to do, so. Yeah, I don't have anything bad to say about them.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Mmhmm. Did you opinion of Christie change after?

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah, a little bit. He, um, he's done a pretty decent job in this part of the recovery.

22:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So how do you feel about the response that you got from the rest of the country?

NELSON RIVERA: That was, it was, it was a lot of response from a lot of part of the country.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Mmm.

NELSON RIVERA: It was unbelievable how many people came. I had people from California, Virginia, Maine, Georgia in this house. I mean, I had- I can't tell you how many people came from all parts of the country.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right. Has this shaped your environmental views in any way?

NELSON RIVERA: Um, yeah. I guess you gotta be prepared now for anything major.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So have things returned back to normal, for the most part?

NELSON RIVERA: For the most part. It's getting there.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And, um, so, have there been any changes to your daily life?

23:00

NELSON RIVERA: Um, no, just over the- I mean, the whole [something] of life is a little different.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

NELSON RIVERA: It could be normal one day, things could just change overnight.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Right, right. What are some problems you're still facing?

NELSON RIVERA: What was that?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What are some problems that you're still facing?

NELSON RIVERA: Um, just trying to catch up with bills.

[both laugh]

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yeah. So, you still had the bills while the house is being--

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah, I still pay the mortgage, electric, the water, and all my utilities, and even if the house was not livable.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So have you- has everything that happened changed your outlook on the community?

NELSON RIVERA: Yeah, it's gotten strong.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you think this storm impacted the presidential 24:00election in any way?

NELSON RIVERA: Um, I don't think so.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, do you think it impacted the governor election?

NELSON RIVERA: The governor, yeah. Yeah, he definitely did a good job so he landslide to the election, but the president might be a different story. All depends who runs.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you- would you have a word of advice to give to those in the future or those who have recently suffered a devastation similar to this, like those in Moore with the tornadoes, and the Philippines?

NELSON RIVERA: The only thing I can say is, be prepared for any major storm, any hurricanes. If you're told to evacuate, you should evacuate. You take a chance of losing your family, or your kids, or anything, so. So it's good to be prepared and plan ahead and you have to leave and come back, the only thing you 25:00will lose is material.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Do you have- do you think that the storm carries any legacy? What would that be?

NELSON RIVERA: Sandy? I think it's- would be probably one of the most [unclear] storms in New Jersey for a long time.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: All right. Okay. Is there anything else that I missed that you possibly wanted to share?

NELSON RIVERA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: No.

NELSON RIVERA: I think that's good.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, so then, that's it.

0:00 - Interview introduction

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:My name is Trudi-Ann Lawrence and today is December 12.

Segment Synopsis: An introduction to the interview with Nelson Rivera.

Keywords:

Subjects:

0:06 - Brief biography

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Can you state your name?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera discusses how he met his wife and decided to live in Union Beach. He also talks about how close-knit his community is.

Keywords: Beach; Community; Cost; Daughters; Ethnicity; Family; Home; House; Houses; Involved; Jersey shore; Lived; Neighborhood; New Jersey; Occupation; Red Bank; Rooms; Schools; Small town; Sons; Union Beach

Subjects:


GPS: Union Beach, Nj.
Map Coordinates: 40.446517, -74.177809

2:51 - First word of the storm

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay, so now we're going to talk about the storm. When was the first- when did you first hear the storm was coming?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera talks his expected outcome of the storm and his lack of preparation at the time. He also believes that there was adequate warning for those in the community about the upcoming storm.

Keywords: Adequate warning; Bedrooms; Dogs; Expect; Flooding; Gas; Governor; House; Lack of preparation; Lived; Mandatory evacuation; Neighborhood; Neighbors; Nor'easter; Power; Preparations; Storm; Street; Water

Subjects:

5:52 - Day of the storm

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. So take me through the first day of the storm, like where were you, what were the first signs of the storm?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera discusses the conditions of the neighborhood when the storm had hit. He also talks about staying with his brother-in-law and finding the whole Brooke Avenue house-less.

Keywords: Beach; Brooke Avenue; Car; Contact; Damage; Debris; Dogs; Family; House; Insurance; Keyport; Morning; Power lines; Roof; Signs; Sleep; Storm; Street; Town; Union Beach; Water; Wind

Subjects:


GPS: Brooke Avenue (Union Beach, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.447531, -74.164214

9:55 - Damages suffered

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay, so tell me about the damages you suffered. Was it the entire first floor?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera talks about the flooding of his house and wife's car along with his backyard being destroyed by the storm. He also discusses how mold began to form in his house causing his family to get sick. Even though he was still sick, Rivera stood in the house (his wife and children left) to continue to try to fix the damages.

Keywords: Apartment; Calgary Chapel Church; Car; Country; Damages; FEMA; Flood insurance; Floors; Gas; Gas station lines; Gas stations; Gateway Church Of Christ; Generators; House; Insurance; Mold; Mud; Port Monmouth; Power; Rain Foundation; Rebuild; Suffered; Volunteers; War zone; Window

Subjects:


GPS: Gateway Church of Christ (Morganville, Nj.)
Map Coordinates: 40.384470, -74.186886

13:02 - Coping with the storm / safety after the storm

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:okay, so how did you cope with everything that was going on around you?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera talks about how his Union Beach neighborhood learned to come together while healing from the storm. He also discusses his experience with someone trying to break into his house a while after the storm.

Keywords: Community; Cope; Coping; Damage; Dogs; Donation; Food; Help; House; Information; Looting; Lost; Neighbors; Night; Police station; Rebuild; Residents; Safe; Strong

Subjects:

15:35 - Emergency personnel

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Right. So, what was the interaction with your emergency personnel like?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera talks about how he contributed at the local police department. Also, he discusses the lack of help from his insurance company.

Keywords: Aid; Basement; Christie; Churches; Contributors; Emergency; Fireman; Help; Helping; House; Insurance companies; Job; Lost; New Jersey; New Jersey Strong; Pictures; Police station; Respond; Response; State; Volunteers; Work

Subjects:

18:33 - New Jersey Strong / opinion on preparation for the storm

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:So can you tell me more about the Jersey Strong, because this is the first time I've heard you reference it- anyone reference it as being a type of aid?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera reveals his knowledge of the New Jersey Strong aid program. He also tells that he believes global warming might be a cause for these violent storms getting stronger.

Keywords: Aid; Barack Obama; Building; Chris Christie; Christie; Dunes; Global warming; Governor Christie; Hundred-year storm; Hurricane Sandy; Insurance; Money; Nature; New Jersey; New Jersey Strong; Obama; Perfect storm; Phillipines; Prepared; Prepared adequately; President Obama; Rebuild; Recovery; Shore; State; Storm

Subjects:

21:03 - Media coverage / opinions of President Obama and Governor Christie

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay, how do you feel about the media coverage? Do you think it was accurate or it was sensationalized?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera reveals his opinions on President Obama and Governor Christie after their attempt to help in New Jersey's time of need. He also believes the media coverage was accurate and was astounded by how much support he received from people from all different areas of the country.

Keywords: Accurate; Appearance; Area; Barack Obama; California; Changed; Chris Christie; Christie; Country; Coverage; Environment; Georgia; Governor Christie; Help; House; Job; Maine; Media; Obama; Prepared; President Obama; Recovery; Response; Sensationalized; Virginia

Subjects:

22:45 - Daily life after the storm / impact of the storm on the election / legacy of the storm

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. So have things returned back to normal, for the most part?

Segment Synopsis: Rivera discusses his opinion about the appearance of Governor Christie after Hurricane Sandy leading to his winning of the election. He also believes that for the future, it is important to evacuate when told during state of emergencies and to always have a plan.

Keywords: After the storm; Changed; Community; Daily life; Election; Electricity; Evacuate; Family; Future; Governor; Gubernatorial campaign; House; Hurricane; Impacting; Kids; Legacy; Moore, Oklahoma; Mortgage; New Jersey; Normal; Outlook; Philippines; Plans; Prepared; President; Storm; Strong; Tornadoes; Water

Subjects:

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