0:00

TRUDI ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. My name is Trudi Ann Lawrence. Today is May 15, 2013, and I am in -- this is Port Monmouth [unintelligible - 00: 00: 12]…

IRIS MIRANDA: Port Monmouth.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: In Port Monmouth. And can you tell me your name?

IRIS MIRANDA: Iris Miranda.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And if you don't mind, your age.

IRIS MIRANDA: Forty.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How long have you lived here?

IRIS MIRANDA: July will be eleven years.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And in this house? Okay. If you don't mind, can you tell me roughly the cost of the house?

IRIS MIRANDA: We paid 240,000 for it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And how many rooms are in the house?

IRIS MIRANDA: There's four bedrooms, a kitchen, living room, this dining room, two and a half baths, and a laundry room.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Is there a specific reason why you chose to live in this house?

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, we were originally going to go to -- because I'm originally from Brooklyn, so we were going to go to Upstate New York because my husband 1:00worked for the NYPD.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But before we decided, he got called for the Port Authority, which is for New York and Jersey. So when he did his training, it was in Sea Girt.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So he fell in love with New Jersey. It was like, "You're taking me to where?" "New Jersey." Well, I worked for Morgan Stanley and a couple of the account reps told me, move to Middletown, move to Middletown. Okay. And we came here, we saw a couple of houses, but once we saw this and looked across the street, we fell in love. That was it. We fell in love with the wetlands.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So it wasn't more so the neighborhood. It was just the view in which you got?

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, before we even decided, we drove around, and I talked to a lot of people. I'm very talkative. You'll see. And I asked the neighborhoods, 2:00I went to the stores. I wanted to see how it was all about. The beach is right there.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yeah.

IRIS MIRANDA: It's not like there's no life or anything, but there's fishing, it's beautiful. The [Spy] House is right down the block. I don't know if you've been to it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: No.

IRIS MIRANDA: It's open on Sundays.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: From one to four. It's really [unintelligible - 00: 02: 24] I don't know, in 1700s or something like that. But we just fell in love with it. The house was more than we expected. We were looking for a three-bedroom house. We got an extra bedroom. We liked the yard and everything, so we were like, "You know what? The price was good," in our eyes, so the…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: And that was it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So tell me about your family. Who makes up your family?

IRIS MIRANDA: Okay. There's five of us. It's my husband, Eddie, or Edilberto. 3:00We call him Eddie. Myself, I have three boys, CJ, he's ten. Well, his name is Christopher.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Kevin, he's fifteen, and David, he's in the -- he's twenty. He's in the Marines.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay, okay. And what do you do, your occupation?

IRIS MIRANDA: I'm a stay-at-home now.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. What did you used to do?

IRIS MIRANDA: I was an analyst and worked in Morgan Stanley.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: At the brokerage company.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: And your husband, he still works for Port Authority?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yes, he does.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And how long did you work for Morgan Stanley?

IRIS MIRANDA: I worked -- I was first attempt for maybe about two years, and then I think it was four years after that.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And what were -- if you don't mind, what would you say your salary income or bracket was?

IRIS MIRANDA: Myself?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yes.

IRIS MIRANDA: It was I think about fifty grand.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And your husband combined?

IRIS MIRANDA: Combined together, I think we were maybe a hundred back then.

4:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So I know you talk about the beach being there. Is that what you like most about New Jersey since you're a New Yorker?

IRIS MIRANDA: Let me tell you. I knew nothing of New Jersey, nothing. I never left Brooklyn. The furthest I went was Queens. But I know that -- I always dreamt to buy a house and all that, and I wanted the kids to come to a better school. And I did my homework and the schools are really good here, so I did more so for the kids…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: … than for me. Because I missed having the bodegas in every corner. I have to drive to everything here. The convenience of having the bus, the train, you don't have that here.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yeah.

IRIS MIRANDA: But more so for the kids.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Where do you hang out around here? Usually, what do 5:00you call your hangout spot or the kids' hangout spot? Nowhere?

IRIS MIRANDA: Nowhere. I volunteer a lot for the elementary school where my son goes in Port Monmouth Elementary, but I still go back to Brooklyn.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: How do you feel about the Jersey Shore? Do you think that it portrays the area well or no?

IRIS MIRANDA: I really don't do much in Jersey.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: It's just my whole family is in Brooklyn. So when we get together, they do everything in Brooklyn.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: The only time they come to Jersey is when I have a barbecue.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: That's the only time we get together in Jersey. But I don't do anything really in New Jersey.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. You said that you're very involved in the community by volunteering. Is there anything else that you're involved in doing within the community?

IRIS MIRANDA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Are there any school -- like how the schools, the 6:00reputation of the community in itself, since you've been living here and you've been doing your research, what would you say -- how does the reputation compare?

IRIS MIRANDA: I love the schools. I don't have a problem. The only issue that I had was when my oldest son was in high school. A lot of racial stuff was said to him, but the school took care of it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: I was really happy with the way the school took care of it because I was pretty upset. But that was the only issues we ever had with the school.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you know if the community has any nicknames or anything like that? No?

IRIS MIRANDA: No, sorry.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: That's fine. It's okay. So now we're going to talk a little bit about the storm. I'm going to get into that. When did you first hear the storm was coming?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think we were -- they started maybe on the weekend. I think it 7:00was Saturday, they were saying there was a storm that might hit us and everything, Sunday when the emergency people came by. They knocked on the doors. They said, "You should evacuate." And we did.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You did?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So in evacuation, did you -- how did you prepare the house before you evacuated?

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, we did -- because of Irene the year before, it wasn't -- we got no water or -- I mean, we did the backyard. Our shed was -- I don't know what it is. It sits in a hole, because the shed got a lot of water. But in the front, some water came in to the garage, so we were like, "Okay. We have to be smart this time." So we took off everything from the porch. We took all our 8:00tables, set them up in the garage; we put everything on the tables in the garage. The backyard, we tied everything down. We bungeed everything. We took the shed and everything that we thought -- the shed had gotten with Irene a couple of -- I think it was a foot of water, maybe. I'm not too sure, maybe two. So we made sure we lifted it at least four feet.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Everything in the shed. That's how we prepared.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Did you bring anything with you when you were evacuating that you consider valuables?

IRIS MIRANDA: Pictures, all our papers for the house, IDs, birth certificates. That stuff we took with us.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And I'm presuming you went to Brooklyn.

IRIS MIRANDA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: No?

IRIS MIRANDA: No, we could not. We were afraid of the traffic that might hit.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So we -- I have two small dogs.

9:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So we went to Edison. We were able to find a hotel in Edison.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So when did you leave?

IRIS MIRANDA: Sunday.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Around what time?

IRIS MIRANDA: We left Sunday at night.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: In the nighttime?

IRIS MIRANDA: At night we left.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Because it hit Monday, right?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yes.

IRIS MIRANDA: It hit Monday, yeah. We left Sunday.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So you took stuff. Now, you were in a hotel in -- so you had to bring food and stuff. How did you take care of that? Because I know the lines were busy.

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, that weekend, when they were announcing it, we were one of those. We brought three gallons of milk, cases of water. I went and bought cereal for the kids, stuff that was easy to make. I know it sounds ridiculous, but Cup Noodle soup, simple stuff. So I packed all of that. I took all of that with me.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So we stayed at the hotel about -- I think it was for two days.

10:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Two days?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think it was three days we stayed, but we came after Sandy.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So you felt that the area got enough warning about the hurricane that was coming?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think so. They did come and knock at my door. I can't tell you if they knocked on everybody's door. And then they did -- the police department came by and announced it also, driving by.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So take me to the day of the storm when you were in Edison.

IRIS MIRANDA: Oh, boy. We were in Edison. I kept in contact with some of my neighbors. They did send me pictures. And I couldn't believe that we couldn't see the street. And there was still light out. And when the power went out, I think -- we had power at Edison. We never lost power. That was a good thing. They said that they couldn't see how fast the water was coming because it was 11:00dark, but I couldn't tell you anything. I mean, I didn't come back until the next day.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. But for -- in Edison, what was it like in Edison?

IRIS MIRANDA: Oh, in Edison. There was a lot of wind, a lot of rain. People told me here it didn't rain, but in Edison, it rained. When I tell you it rained, it rained over there. I mean, trees did fall around the whole town. We were like, "Oh, we left our house. A tree is going to fall on our car." We're like, "What did we do?" Yeah, but…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Is there a specific reason why you chose Edison?

IRIS MIRANDA: Edison, because when I looked on the map, I was like, "Oh, it's far away from the ocean. I think we should be good." I did a quick search.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. It was more inland, that's what you were aiming for.

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah. And I don't want to -- just to go to Brooklyn, my mother 12:00lives in the third floor. I knew we'd be fine there, but just to hit the traffic and then to come back, we didn't know if bridges were going to be out or what.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: We wanted to stay close.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So I'm presuming you and your family, you went through everything normally. It was fine for you guys.

IRIS MIRANDA: Over there at the hotel?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yes, at Edison.

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah, we were fine.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. I'm going to change my questions up a little bit. When did you come back?

IRIS MIRANDA: The next day.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: The next day?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yes.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So that would have been Tuesday?

IRIS MIRANDA: Tuesday. We didn't check out, but we did come to check the house.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So you were expecting if it was unlivable, we'll just go back?

IRIS MIRANDA: Right.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So when you got here, what did you see?

IRIS MIRANDA: What did I see? Garbage.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Wow.

IRIS MIRANDA: Everywhere. We were like, "What happened here?" I always had a 13:00little bit of landscaping, it was all -- I had mulch all over. Where did the mulch go? Like everything, my flowers, we were like -- we thought a tornado hit. There was literally garbage all over the street. We were like, "Oh, God. My porch."

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Was the street drivable? Can you drive on it, because…

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, when we first got here, this was still flooded.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: They said there was still a high tide.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So we had to wait an hour by my neighbors'. It was just right here, this house and a little bit of that house, because I get flood here because I have the drain.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So we waited, and a couple of other neighbors that lived down block were waiting there too. I guess they stayed out -- I don't know really the neighbors down the block. But they were there, and we waited until it came down, like an hour. And then we came in as soon -- we came up, this -- all the 14:00mulch that was on my flowers was here. We couldn't believe, like, how did the mulch get on the porch? It was full. When we came in here, there was like… I don't know. It was black. It looked like hair, like black hair all over. I think it was like…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Inside the house?

IRIS MIRANDA: Inside the house.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Wow.

IRIS MIRANDA: All over the floor. We were like, "Oh God." Please just let it just be in the front here. When we came, my floors -- this is on -- I had to tear up everything. My floors were [unintelligible - 00: 14: 40]. They were buckling and everything. I had ceramic tiles here. They were cracking already, so.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What did you do when you saw this?

IRIS MIRANDA: What did we do?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Because you were still on Tuesday. So you saw it. What did 15:00you do when you…?

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, we came in. We looked around and we saw that our moldings -- I couldn't believe it, literally, the next day to Sandy, we couldn't believe that our walls were bubbling up. We were like -- but we saw the water line. The water line was about six inches.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: We couldn't believe there was six inches of water here. So we checked everything here and our hot water heater. By the time we came back, we couldn't get that started, so that had to go. When we entered the garage, I think a tornado hit the garage. Everything I had on the tables was thrown or -- when I tell you that…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: The tables that you set up four feet high?

IRIS MIRANDA: The tables I set. All the tables that -- I put everything on the tables. That was a waste because we spent a whole day doing that. Everything was thrown all over the place. We couldn't open the garage door because 16:00everything fell to the garage door so we had to move everything. Then we went to the shed. When we looked at the shed -- you would have to see the shed. The whole shed was underwater.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Wow.

IRIS MIRANDA: My six-foot fence was underwater. When we looked at our pool, there's a tree in our pool. The tree is still there. I refuse to remove it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Really?

IRIS MIRANDA: It's still there. It caved in my pool. And just -- I couldn't believe I had these huge flowerpots literally floated from where I had them to the middle of the yard. These huge, heavy flowerpots, everything, everything was -- like somebody came and just started throwing my stuff around.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So what was the mood and the scene of the community?

IRIS MIRANDA: Just sad.

17:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: It was sad.

IRIS MIRANDA: It was sad. Just to -- as soon as we saw our house, we immediately went to our neighbor. We went to -- his garage doors blew open, so everything was exposed in his house downstairs. We went to our neighbors here. He wasn't here. We called him. We're like, "You have to come. You have water." The water line of his garage is five feet. So we went driving around to see if anybody really needed help or anybody was injured or anything, because we knew we were okay. We knew we had damage, but we went around and it was just sad.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Your cell phone was working fine?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah. Actually, we had service and we had electricity over there.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What cell phone company did you have?

IRIS MIRANDA: Verizon.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. They were the only working ones. Okay. So, did you 18:00end up going back to the hotel?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yes, we did because there was no power. You know, with the kids and everything. And we knew the hot water heater was no good. We didn't put the heat on in the house because our vents, our ducts in the basement were underwater. My whole basement, all the insulation was on the floor, everything, so.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Is your basement a finished basement?

IRIS MIRANDA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: It's a -- you crawl in but you can stand.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But it's all cinder block.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: When did you return?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think -- we stayed Saturday night. I think we came back Wednesday. We want to stay another day, but once we got back, we just started working and just moving stuff around.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So how did you make it around when you actually got 19:00back with the lack of power and everything?

IRIS MIRANDA: We -- on Sunday, I think it was Sunday, we bought a generator.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: We were able to buy a generator, so we were able to survive that way.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So how long was your power outage?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think it was sixteen days.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Sixteen days. And how long before stores opened up around your area for you to go get things that you needed?

IRIS MIRANDA: I don't know. I didn't go shopping. My family came. My family came from Brooklyn.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: They brought you items.

IRIS MIRANDA: And they brought me supplies.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: They did? Okay. How was getting gas?

IRIS MIRANDA: Sucked. Oh boy, that sucked.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Yeah.

IRIS MIRANDA: It was bad. My husband -- actually, one day the lines were -- I think they were three hours long here. He called his brother, and his brother 20:00lives by Camden, New Jersey. My husband actually drove all the way out there to get gas. He got gas for his neighbors, everybody. We couldn't get gas here. So he drove an hour and a half to go get gas.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: How long before mail came?

IRIS MIRANDA: I don't know.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You don't know?

IRIS MIRANDA: I don't know. I didn't even pay attention to that because I know mail is bills.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Trash pickup in the area, did they come up the next day? How long before they came out?

IRIS MIRANDA: Trash pickup, I don't know when they came, but trash itself, I don't think we actually had -- what we had was our stuff that was damaged.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: And the town came and they picked that up. I know they did like bulk pickups.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How did you clean up?

21:00

IRIS MIRANDA: How did we clean up? With a bucket of Clorox and a mop.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: How would say it took to at least get the stuff off the ground?

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, the next day, not the day after Sandy -- on Wednesday. I already knew. Me and my husband, we like to prepare.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So we already had our list on what we were going to do when we got here on Wednesday.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. After seeing it on Tuesday?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yes.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Tuesday we already knew. He was going to -- with my son, my fifteen-year-old, he was going to go and attack the garage because we couldn't open the garage door. There was still water there. We had five and a half feet.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Resting?

IRIS MIRANDA: It was already -- it had gone.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Receded, okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Receded. But just everything had that -- it was -- I can't tell you what it was. It was just like a black soot on everything, but it was thick 22:00and it looked like hair.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Maybe from the marsh?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah, that's what I think. So he was doing that. So what I did was he helped me get rid of furniture, furniture that was no good anymore. We got rid of that. And then what I did was I went room by room and emptied out every room, and I combed everything…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Upstairs was damage as well?

IRIS MIRANDA: No. Upstairs, no.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Excuse me, we only had six inches of water here, so we were able to get upstairs.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But there was no hot water, no heat, no power. But just that whole day I spent cleaning everything with Clorox. I didn't know what to do. I didn't know what to use. That's what I did.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. I know you got some support from your family, but what about -- who else did you get support from in terms of the power company, 23:00the insurance, FEMA?

IRIS MIRANDA: Well, okay. I got to say that the firehouse here in Port Monmouth, they were awesome. They were great. They would come by, ask if you needed anything. They will bring you food. We didn't see the Red Cross until maybe a week and a half later coming by. And let me tell you, they got to lighten up on the lead foot that they have. They will come by and speed down this. We didn't have enough time for me to get from my living room downstairs to stop them for them to give us food. And then you would stop them and they were like, "Can I help you?" "What are you giving out? I can't cook. I know you're giving out food." "How many in your family?" Not the nicest people.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Those volunteers, I did not appreciate. But the people in the 24:00firehouse were awesome. They were there every day. They will come and walk down or drive down and see if you needed anything. Regarding FEMA, FEMA is nice enough to have you apply for SBA loan.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What's SBA?

IRIS MIRANDA: SBA, Small -- what is it? A Small Business -- SBA, Small Business… oh God, what's -- it's a loan that FEMA gives you with a very low interest rate.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: And you fill out -- it's hell to fill out. The paperwork on it is ridiculous. You would think they're giving you this money. They're giving it 25:00to you. No, we're going to pay it back, because you got to pay it back with interest. FEMA helps you initially. I think the first month, they gave everyone that was displaced. I think it depend -- how many depend -- how many people in the family. They gave us -- I think it was $3,200.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: That was to cover two months.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: We left our home for a month and a half. We lived in Staten Island. We couldn't -- FEMA gave us a list of apartments to go check. We went to every apartment they had. They wouldn't rent month to month. They wanted you to rent for at least six months. These are the people that they gave you on their list, FEMA's list. No, we don't want kids. These are the stories. These 26:00are the things that they told us. No pets, which is understandable. Not everybody accepts pets. So we went -- I went all over Middletown. One day, me and my husband trying to find a place to go, we couldn't live here. No heat, no hot water, couldn't cook. Thank God my cousin had just bought house. He had a full finished basement, and we were able to live there for a month and a half.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But since I wasn't renting a place, FEMA will not give you money. FEMA doesn't give you for gas. FEMA doesn't give you for tolls, for nothing. But if you go rent somewhere, they'd gladly pay that for you. I don't understand that. They can't pay you for gas. It's a lot less than paying an 27:00apartment for somebody. I was displaced. Insurance. Insurance was hell. Hell, hell, hell. Insurance, I don't know why we pay insurance. We had to get a public adjuster because the insurance was giving us so much, so much work. They came here. They were like, "Oh, you had extensive damage. We'll see what we can do." "What do you mean you'll see what you can do? You see there's damage. We pay homeowner's insurance, flood insurance. What do you mean?" That took forever. So we basically used all our funds. We had no money left by the time the insurance paid. So whatever the -- and the insurance doesn't cover everything. Whoever tells you the insurance covered everything, they're lying. Insurance didn't cover anything. Then we fall -- we get no assistance beside 28:00all these grants and all these fundraisers that get done and all this money. We went to a meeting the other day, and they gave us at least about fifty websites to go in that they would help you with repairs and all these. If you're not handicapped, if you're not low income, or if you're not displaced, they can't help you. So I have to be homeless for you to come help me? I had to use all my funds. So I have no funds now, but I can't get any help. How was that fair? Yeah, I'm in my house. I was gone a month and a half. I drove every day to 29:00bring my kids to school in Middletown, every day. I sat in my car for six hours waiting for them to get out of school. But people with no income, disabilities, or displaced were in the town, got the help, but I didn't get any help. If I didn't pay insurance, I wouldn't get any help. And then insurance had to pay because they had to. But if I didn't have any insurance, I would be screwed.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. So did you have a curfew in your town?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah, they had a curfew and you had to live in here. You had to show ID to get in.

30:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. What was the curfew time?

IRIS MIRANDA: I'm not -- I think it was nine o'clock, I think. Once it got dark.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Did you work with your other community members to help clean up the area?

IRIS MIRANDA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And how did you basically cope with the damages and not having the things you need? I know you said you moved and you lived somewhere else, but did it take an emotional toll on you as well?

IRIS MIRANDA: It still does. You get frustrated. Like I said, thank God my cousin was there. We were here I think a month before I went to my cousin's, just to wash clothes. We were repeating our clothes, washing our undergarments by hand in ice water. People don't know that, you know.

31:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: The generator wasn't of any help to power the heat or any of that?

IRIS MIRANDA: No, it took us I think it was like two weeks to get the hot water put on, but it wasn't working like it was supposed to, I guess. I don't know, because maybe the house was too cold? I don't know.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But it was just horrible. Just the simple things, like to eat, to eat. I can't tell you how much pizza we ate. Pizza was our best friend. They knew us at the pizzeria. There wasn't -- if the truck didn't come by, we didn't even have time to think to eat. Sometimes I'll be like, "Oh, my God. I got to feed the kids." The kids were so busy working. My ten-year-old helping us move 32:00stuff, do stuff, simple things like that. It makes you so angry. Oh, did I want to scream. Oh, did I want to curse out everybody. I was so upset. I couldn't believe I'm like -- I will go to my cousin's house. Even when I was staying at my cousin, I watch the TV and I'm like, "Where are these people? These people are getting help. Where are they over here?" People would drive by. During the day, there was -- you could come in, taking pictures. I got pissed off. One day, some lady was taking a picture. I said, "Why are you taking a picture of my house?" She's like, "Oh, no. Did you get damaged? I'll go help." "Yeah, I did." She said, "I'll take your pictures." "Why don't you come in here and help us move garbage?" I was so -- I couldn't believe it. I 33:00was like -- but on TV, all these people are getting helped. I'm like, us four, my ten-year-old, my fifteen-year-old, my husband and myself, we were busting our butts moving everything to the curb. Do you know how sad it is to put your furniture out there, put your floors out there? I had just had done this about -- I gutted the whole downstairs six years ago. To do it again, it was heartbreaking. And I'm like, "Eddie, I know this help is coming. They're going to come help us. I know it's coming." It didn't come to us because we didn't have major damage. We didn't have where we had the orange sticker on our door. Oh, they don't have the orange sticker, they're okay. Bull crap we were okay. But let me tell you, I wanted to wring everybody's neck. How we dealt with it? 34:00I tell my husband it's just material. Just like we had it once, we'll do it again. It'll take us longer this time, but we'll do it again.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Was there anybody else in the community apart from the Port Monmouth firehouse that assisted you? Were there any religious communities that came in?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yes, the Christian -- they were Amish. They came by. They came and they -- what I had done was I had left my kitchen intact. They had all the -- I had to throw refrigerator out, my dishwasher out, the stove I had to have disconnect because of the gas. But I had left whatever I could because I had the sink, it was still working. They came in, they took out the kitchen out for me and they did my garage. They ripped out the walls.

35:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But everything else, me and my husband and my family, we tore everything out, and we had -- the guy that originally gutted out my house six years ago came and helped us do it too.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How long were your children out of school?

IRIS MIRANDA: They closed school for two weeks, but me not sending them, I took them every day from Staten Island.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: So they didn't miss school.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: All right. Is this a bussed area where children are bussed?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yes, yep.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. And within two weeks, the buses were running again, they were fine?

IRIS MIRANDA: Oh, no.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: No?

IRIS MIRANDA: No, no.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: The buses weren't ready?

IRIS MIRANDA: No. The bus -- I don't remember the buses running. I don't think so.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So you had…

IRIS MIRANDA: I can't…

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You had to take your children to school?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah. I think so. You know what? I'm not 100 percent sure, but I think we took them to school.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How did you contribute? Did you contribute -- you 36:00opened up your house? Did you give any resources…?

IRIS MIRANDA: My neighbors, once I got the water heater working, they came here and took showers. We helped each other. Our neighbors watched our houses. We helped take out some stuff from our neighbors' houses. My neighbors, just him and his wife, my other neighbor's -- he's by himself. So we helped each other move our home to the curb.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. You spoke briefly about the response that you [unintelligible - 00: 36: 41] that. How do you feel about the local government? Were they of any help, or any local organizations? I know you said the Red Cross, they were…

IRIS MIRANDA: The Red -- I'm telling you, they had a lead foot. I would literally -- when I would hear them on the back block, I would -- me and my son, we finally -- we knew they were coming. We would hear the -- on the back block, 37:00we would stand in the front because that's how fast they would drive by. They would just zoom by. Government? Like what? Maybe you know some?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: There wasn't any governmental help, from New Jersey state aid or anything of that?

IRIS MIRANDA: Not to us.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: No?

IRIS MIRANDA: Like I said, you're not disabled, you're not displaced out of your home or low income, you're screwed.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Did the governor come here in Port Monmouth?

IRIS MIRANDA: He went to the firehouse, yes.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: The same firehouse that was kind of helpful? Okay. Do you feel like New Jersey prepared adequately, like they had enough dunes? Do you think that there was something that they could have told you or warned you about -- like, could this have been avoided?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah. They should have did that project that they've been trying 38:00to get money for since 19 what -- '92, '91? If they would have fixed that, we would've never gotten flooded here.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Can you for the record just briefly describe the project?

IRIS MIRANDA: From what I understand, they were supposed to put dunes over here, right here where the Spy House is. They were supposed to put a floodgate over there. There is a marina. Where the marina is, that's what they were saying. And a floodgate on Main Street over here, that's by the fishery over there.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: That's what I was told. They were supposed to put some drains here in the wetlands, but I don't know. But that -- I was told at that meeting that they had plans in 1991 or 1992. Sandy was 2012. Maybe could've been 39:00prevented. They knew it was going to happen in a matter of time. They knew it was going to happen. The storm was waiting.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Do you think they knew that they would have been of that magnitude? Because you said Irene came and it was barely anything.

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah. But they had Donna, they said, in the '60s.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: Donna from what I was told came up pretty high. A lot of homes were damaged.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But back in the days, the old timers said that there was no nothing about mold, nothing like that. People didn't -- now everything -- I mean, within a week, we had mold growing.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. How do you feel about the media and their coverage? Was it sensationalized? Do you think that they adequately portrayed the need 40:00and the devastation?

IRIS MIRANDA: The media did a great job getting stories for you to watch TV. What they had to do was knock on everybody's freaking door and ask them, "What do you need?" That's what they had to do. All that money that was raised, I'm a Sandy victim. I didn't see nothing, anything from that. Where is that money? It could help me. I had to use my funds, funds for my kids. I don't have that now. What do I tell my kids? Oh, sorry. Sandy took it. All that money that was raised, I kept telling my husband, "Don't worry about it, think positive. Help is going to come." Anyway, it sucks.

41:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: How do you feel about the president coming in the area and Chris Christie?

IRIS MIRANDA: I didn't see either of them, so I don't think much of it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Did your opinion change of Chris Christie?

IRIS MIRANDA: No. Same as I always thought of him. He didn't come help me. I mean, yeah, it was nice that he came and he said whatever had to be said, whatever. Like I said, I didn't get help. I'm getting help now. I'm getting a loan that I have to pay. How nice is that, that I have to take a loan out?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Do you think that they country's response was similar to 42:00Katrina? Do you think that Sandy victims got more help or Katrina victims got more help?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think after Katrina, a lot of people saw the devastation and the heartache that they did help Sandy victims, moneywise to the fundraising. But I don't think it gets to everybody in that way. Yeah, people donated. People helped. I couldn't believe my family sent money. I was like, "You guys sent money to donate? You could've gave me the money because I didn't see any of it." People are so misled. My own family was misled. They knew I was affected. Out of everybody in my family, I was the only one affected in Sandy. 43:00They thought they were helping so much in donating money. I said, "You're better off mailing it to me." Mail wasn't working, but I would've eventually gotten it. Because six months later, I don't see anything.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Do you think that this was also an environmental issue that changed your views of any way?

IRIS MIRANDA: My next house, no water, no ocean, no river, no stream, not a puddle in front of the house. That's my next house. I'm going to be on the top of a mountain. It's the truth. I'm not lying to you.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Do you have to raise your home?

IRIS MIRANDA: I don't think so.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: You're not being required to?

44:00

IRIS MIRANDA: No. We haven't received anything that we have to raise, so I'm thinking we don't.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: We were told that everyone that had to raise would get a letter. But we were told that -- the town has said that. Everybody that would need to raise would get a letter. So I'm thinking we don't. We never got the letter.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: And yet none of us did, so.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. Did anybody on your block get an orange sticker?

IRIS MIRANDA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: No, I'm lying. The corner house did. He's not there. The very corner house and the house right next to it, because they sit really, really low to the ground.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. All right. So we're going to wrap up. This is the last session. Have things really returned to normal?

IRIS MIRANDA: We're almost there. Like I tell everybody, I didn't let this make -- I did not cry. I refuse to cry over material things. I really did think that 45:00we were going to get the aid, but we didn't. But you know what? It's material things. We will get it all back. As you can see, I'm trying to return back to -- I still don't have a kitchen. There is no cabinets, no nothing. I still don't have a kitchen. I cook on hot plates and a toaster oven.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Really?

IRIS MIRANDA: Yeah. But little by little, I try to keep it as positive as I can for my kids. They love it here. Believe me, the first thing I wanted to do was not open that door and just leave and not come back. So many times did I say, "Pa, why don't we just leave? Leave the house." But we really do like it here. We really do. We have awesome neighbors, awesome. I cannot complain about my 46:00neighbors. They're awesome. You need anything, they're there. I love the schools. I really, really do love the schools. I like the people around here. And I'm an oddball here. I'm the black dot on that white piece of paper, but everybody is so nice. Everybody is so nice. And we want to stay. Our original plan was once our little one, CJ, graduates high school, we were always going to move, downsize. We wouldn't need as many rooms. My oldest son, he's not here. He's away. And if everything goes well, we'll stick to our plan.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: So apart from the hot plates, are there any other changes to your daily life?

IRIS MIRANDA: Just a lot of work all the time, simple things. Like I have a 47:00tree in my pool but the homeowners' insurance said it was Sandy, the water that damaged it. So of course they don't pay us for that. Our deck has to be replaced. Of course insurance doesn't want to pay you for that. So it's just little things that -- simple things that you would think. But the kids go to school every day, same time.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Is the garage covered, and the shed?

IRIS MIRANDA: The shed wasn't covered.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: But the garage is?

IRIS MIRANDA: The garage is.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: The shed is not part of your home, so. Little things that they put out there. Yeah, no. The shed wasn't covered. The pool wasn't covered. The deck wasn't covered. What else? They depreciate everything, everything that you have, they depreciate everything. So we go to buy, say, a kitchen for 48:00ten grand, they only give you about three grand, knowing that it's going to cost you ten grand. So where do you get the other seven? That's where you think you're going to get the help from the government and stuff. I know that the money from the government is not to go buy you your stuff. But you know what, what's the money for then? People that have lost their homes, they're getting complete homes redone. That's not what I want. I want my home back. I'm not asking for you to build me a third floor now. That's not what I'm asking. I'm asking for help for what we can't cover. But we're there. We're surviving. We're strong.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: How did your outlook on the community change?

49:00

IRIS MIRANDA: No.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Not much?

IRIS MIRANDA: No, not much.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. What about the world?

IRIS MIRANDA: The world? I think people were truly out there to help, truly. It's sad that through all of this, they were looting. Who does that?

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Oh yes, I was going to ask you that.

IRIS MIRANDA: You lose everything and people are looting.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay.

IRIS MIRANDA: But everything was good.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Were there any changes to your political views? Do you think the storm impacted the presidential election in any way?

IRIS MIRANDA: I don't think so. I love Obama. I think he's awesome. I really do. I think he does everything with his heart. Sandy wasn't his fault. I just 50:00get frustrated with just the political part of the money. Everything is, I don't know, thrown everywhere else, not where it's needed.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What about the governor election? Do you think that people are going to vote differently because of Christie and his reaction to the storm?

IRIS MIRANDA: I don't think so. How much can he do? He came, showed up, he's not going to give us money out of his pocket. He was there. I don't think people are going to change their view.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: What are you going to tell your children and your grandchildren when they say, "Oh, hurricane Sandy happened"?

IRIS MIRANDA: Hurricane Sandy, just what I just -- what you just recorded, that's what I would tell them. Listen, don't donate to nothing. Put your money 51:00away. I'm just going to tell them always think positive. That's all you can do. If we can survive Sandy, we could survive anything. I tell that to my kids now.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Okay. If you wanted to give a message about the storm in itself, what would the message be?

IRIS MIRANDA: The storm itself? I don't know. I don't know. I really don't know.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Do you think that the storm has a legacy?

IRIS MIRANDA: I think so. I think so. I know for all of us here in Port Monmouth, I know that it's something that we're going to live forever. Maybe 52:00thirty, forty years from now, maybe we could laugh about it and go, "Oh, we survived Sandy. Oh what, this little storm is coming? That's nothing. We survived Sandy." But it'll always be -- people talk about it, only the ones that went through it. Everybody else will forget, like they've forgotten already. If you went through it, you'll never forget it. If you didn't, you'll forget about it.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Do you think the other storms upcoming will ever -- do you think there's another storm possibly that could ever compare to this? Do you think it's only going to get worse from here on out?

IRIS MIRANDA: I hope not. Because if it does, you're going to come here and this house is going to be abandoned. We'll be gone. There is no way we can ever go through this again, not if we don't get the help, not if we don't get 53:00the help. No way, I would not wish this on anybody. Too bad you can't see it in the recorder, but there were no floors here, no walls, nothing. Cold as hell here. No hot water. I can't describe it to you. I hope there's never a storm like that again. Never, ever. I hope no one ever has to go through that again.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Is there anything that I missed that you want to share, that you want to tell?

IRIS MIRANDA: No. I think you covered everything. I hope I was helpful.

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: Very help. Very, very helpful. It's really [unintelligible - 00: 54: 00].

IRIS MIRANDA: I hope you get different stories because it's different for everybody.

54:00

TRUDI-ANN LAWRENCE: It is. Okay. I'm going to end this recording at 7: 52, and that's it.

0:00 - Interview introduction

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. My name is Trudi Ann Lawrence. Today is May 15, 2013, and I am in -- this is Port Monmouth ...

Segment Synopsis: An introduction to the interview with Iris Miranda.

Keywords:

Subjects:

0:14 - Brief biography

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Partial Transcript:And can you tell me your name?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda discusses her family and her background. She also talks about how she and her husband picked their house.

Keywords: Beach; Brooklyn; Buses; Cost; Dining room; Driving; Family; Home; House; Houses; Income; Kids; Lived; Middletown; Morgan Stanley; Neighborhood; New Jersey; New York; Occupation; Port Monmouth; Queens; Rooms; Salary; School; Sea Girt; Stores; Street; Trains; Work

Subjects:


GPS: Middletown, Nj.
Map Coordinates: 40.396033, -74.091994

4:58 - More about the neighborhood

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Partial Transcript:Okay. Where do you hang out around here? Usually, what do you call your hangout spot or the kids' hangout spot? Nowhere?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda talks about family visits to New Jersey from Brooklyn, NY. She also spoke highly about the schools and how they handle issues.

Keywords: Area; Brooklyn; Community; Family; Jersey shore; Kids; New Jersey; Port Monmouth; School; Volunteer

Subjects:

6:07 - First word of the storm

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Partial Transcript:That's fine. It's okay. So now we're going to talk a little bit about the storm. I'm going to get into that. When did you first hear the storm was coming?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda describes how she prepared for the storm. She traveled to Edison before the storm and tells about the foods she brought in preparation.

Keywords: Brooklyn; Dogs; Doors; Edison; Emergency; Evacuate; Food; Garage; Hotels; House; Hurricane Irene; Kids; Papers; Pictures; Prepare; Storm; Water

Subjects:

10:09 - Warning / Day of the storm

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Partial Transcript:Okay. So you felt that the area got enough warning about the hurricane that was coming?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda talks about leaving to Edison before the storm. She also describes the weather while the storm commenced.

Keywords: Adequate warning; Bridge; Brooklyn; Car; Doors; Family; Floors; Hotels; House; Hurricane; Lost; Neighbors; Ocean; Pictures; Police; Power; Rain; Storm; Street; Town; Tree; Water; Wind

Subjects:


GPS: Edison, Nj.
Map Coordinates: 40.518708, -74.411499

10:13 - The next day

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Partial Transcript:Okay. I'm going to change my questions up a little bit. When did you come back?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda describes the day after the storm. She came back from Edison to see her house which was unrecognizable after all the damage.

Keywords: Flood; Floors; Garage; Garbage; Hit; Hot water heaters; House; Lived; Neighbors; Street; Tornado; Tree; Water

Subjects:

16:52 - Mood of the community / returning home

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Partial Transcript:So what was the mood and the scene of the community?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda talks about going back to Middletown to see what was left of her house after the storm. She also talks about the mood of the community when she went to visit.

Keywords: Basement; Cell phones; Community; Damage; Doors; Driving; Electricity; Garage; Heat; Help; Hot water heaters; Hotels; House; Mood; Moved; Neighbors; Power; Scene; Service; Verizon; Water; Working

Subjects:

18:57 - Conditions of the house after the storm

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Partial Transcript:Okay. so how did you make it around when you actually got back with the lack of power and everything?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda discusses how she and her family were able to clean their house upon returning. She also discloses that she received supplies from visiting family and her husband drove an hour and a half just to get gas.

Keywords: Area; Brooklyn; Camden; Clean up; Damage; Doors; Family; Furniture; Garage; Gas; Gas lines; Generators; Heat; Helped; Mail; Neighbors; Power; Power outage; Prepare; Room; Stores; Supplies; Town; Trash; Water

Subjects:


GPS: Camden, Nj.
Map Coordinates: 39.925709, -75.120377

22:49 - Support of FEMA and insurance companies

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Partial Transcript:Okay. I know you got some support from your family, but what about -- who else did you get support from in terms of the power company, the insurance, FEMA?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda describes the difficult time she had trying to get support. FEMA and her insurance company couldn't really help her family in their time of need.

Keywords: Apartment; Cook; Damage; Family; FEMA; Firehouse; Flood insurance; Food; Fundraisers; Gas; Heat; Help; House; Income; Insurance; Kids; Middletown; Money; Paperwork; Pets; Port Monmouth; Power companies; Public adjuster; Red Cross; Renting; School; Staten Island; Support; Town; Volunteers

Subjects:


GPS: Staten Island, Ny.
Map Coordinates: 40.579470, -74.151282

29:44 - Coping with the loss / community support

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. So did you have a curfew in your town?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda described her frustrations as she and her family had to clean up their house without the help she saw others receive. She also talks about the help received from the Amish with gutting their kitchen.

Keywords: Area; Clean up; Community; Cope; Curfews; Damages; Family; Floors; Furniture; Garbage; Generators; Heat; Help; Helped; Helping; House; Kids; Lived; Moved; Port Monmouth Fire Department; Power; Religious communities; TV; Working

Subjects:

35:18 - Governmental aid / reflection on New Jersey's preparedness

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. How long were your children out of school?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda talks about not receiving governmental aid at all when she was in need. She also believes that New Jersey wasn't as prepared as it should have been.

Keywords: Aid; Buses; Children; Contributors; Damage; Dunes; Firehouse; Flood; Governor; Help; Helped; Home; Hot water heaters; House; Houses; Hurricane Donna; Hurricane Irene; Hurricane Sandy; Local government; Magnitude; Neighborhood; New Jersey; Organization; Prepared adequately; Red Cross; Resources; School; Staten Island

Subjects:

39:52 - Media / president and governor appearances / donations

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. How do you feel about the media and their coverage? Was it sensationalized? Do you think that they adequately portrayed the need and the devastation?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda tells about how the media gave a good show. She also talks about the president and governor making an appearance. Unfortunately, of all the donations made towards Hurricane Sandy, Miranda was unable to see any of it.

Keywords: Area; Chris Christie; Country; Devastation; Donation; Family; Fundraisers; Help; Hurricane Katrina; Hurricane Sandy; Kids; Media; Money; President; Response; TV

Subjects:

43:24 - Environmental views / back to normal

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Okay. Do you think that this was also an environmental issue that changed your views of any way?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda talks about not being required to raise her house and a neighbor having an orange sticker on his house. She also talks about almost getting back to normal in her day-to-day life.

Keywords: Aid; Cook; Doors; Environment; Home; House; Kids; Neighbors; Normal; Ocean; Rooms; Schools; Town; Water

Subjects:

46:51 - Daily life

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:So apart from the hot plates, are there any other changes to your daily life?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda describes her daily life after the storm. She also talks about the damages to her house that were not covered.

Keywords: Changed; Community; Daily life; Garage; Help; Home; Hurricane Sandy; Insurance; Kids; Looting; Lost; Money; Outlook; School; Tree; Work; World

Subjects:

49:36 - Impact on the elections / legacy of the storm

Play segmentSegment link

Partial Transcript:Were there any changes to your political views? Do you think the storm impacted the presidential election in any way?

Segment Synopsis: Miranda thinks the storm did not impact either election. She talks about hoping that a storm like Sandy never hits them again.

Keywords: Children; Christie; Floors; Gubernatorial campaign; Help; House; Hurricane Sandy; Legacy; Message; Money; Obama; Political; Port Monmouth; Presidential campaign; Storm; Vote

Subjects:

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